Clinic Location Update

Updated Tuesday, March 31, 2020

As of Wednesday, April 1, 2020, Fertility Centers of Illinois will be consolidating services from three current locations to locations we believe are central for our patient base.

Thank you all for your support and patience as we navigate these difficult times.


Message From Our Staff

Updated Friday, March 20, 2020

At FCI, we care about your health and the health of our employees. For your safety and theirs, we have as many of them working remotely as possible. This will not limit their ability to manage your questions or concerns. To ensure that our teams are able to communicate with you, we encourage you to sign up for the portal if you have not already done so. We will be communicating with our patients strictly through our patient portals.

If you have any concerns accessing your Patient Portal, please call us at 877-324-4438.


As you are aware, the United States, as well as countries around the world are facing unprecedented times due to the recent outbreak of COVID-19, or the coronavirus. Our thoughts and prayers are with those who have been affected or have loved ones who are unwell.

Fertility Centers of Illinois (FCI) has always been committed to providing exceptional fertility care to our patients. The roadmap of your fertility journey is long and sometimes difficult, with treatments that can take months to plan and implement. We are well aware of how important family is to our patients and staff, and we share your concerns. Your health and the health of our team are our top priority.

Please be assured that the physicians of FCI are staying updated on the latest public and healthcare guidelines. As our knowledge of COVID-19 continues to develop, we expect changes to the federal, state, and local guidelines. We are closely following the recommendations of The American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) in conjunction with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and following their guidance.

There is constantly new information coming out regarding COVID-19, so please make sure to reach out to your care team with questions and check back for updates.


WEBINAR: Maximizing Fertility with TCM

WEBINAR: Fertility Fitness During the COVID-19 Crisis

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20 Affirmations to Power a Positive Outlook During COVID-19

If you are a fertility patient, thinking about, planning or actively in treatment, during these difficult times you have likely been confronted with disappointing changes to your plans.

Information for our Patients (updated 3/20/2020)

Information about the current COVID-19 pandemic.


Frequently Asked Questions

Fertility Treatment – Updated 3/31/2020

What guidelines are you following?

The FDA has issued specific requirements and guidelines to fertility centers around the country, which includes recommendations for when to stop treatments to prevent infection transmission. FCI complies with all federal, state, and local healthcare laws and guidelines to assure the best possible outcome for your treatment and to keep the transmission of infection minimized.

The governing body for fertility practices, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), has updated its guidelines on Tuesday, March 17, 2020. These guidelines were affirmed on Monday, March 30, 2020:

1. Suspension of initiation of new treatment cycles, including ovulation induction, intrauterine inseminations (IUIs), in vitro fertilization (IVF) including retrievals and frozen embryo transfers, and non-urgent gamete cryopreservation.

2. Strongly consider cancellation of all embryo transfers, whether fresh or frozen.

3. Continue to care for patients who are currently ‘in-cycle’ or who require urgent stimulation and cryopreservation. 

4. Suspend elective surgeries and non-urgent diagnostic procedures.

5. Minimize in-person interactions and increase the utilization of telehealth.

The physicians at Fertility Centers of Illinois (FCI) carefully reviewed these recommendations and have chosen to follow the national guidelines for the safety of our patients, staff, and families. As we have stated in the past, fertility treatments are time-sensitive, so your physicians understand it’s important that we do everything in our power to complete your cycle within these guidelines.

As of March 30, the FCI policy is as follows:

  • Any fresh or frozen embryo transfer, endometrial receptivity assay assessment cycle, or intrauterine inseminations must be completed before April 1, 2020
  • All In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) or Fertility Preservation (egg freezing) cycles must be completed by March 31, 2020
  • Any fresh or frozen embryo transfer, endometrial receptivity assay assessment cycle, or intrauterine inseminations must be completed before April 1, 2020
  • All In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) or Fertility Preservation (egg freezing) cycles must start injection therapy before Thursday, March 19, 2020
  • Any fresh IVF embryos that are not transferred before April 1 will be encouraged to do a freeze all cycle and delay the transfer of embryos at this time.

Because patients with cancer cannot delay, fertility preservation treatment will continue throughout the COVID-19 crisis.

  • We will not start any new IUI or frozen embryo transfer protocols. Patients can be cycled on birth control pills, which will allow them to be able to resume care shortly after the current restrictions are lifted.
  • Following the Surgeon General’s recommendations after Friday, March 20, 2020, FCI will no longer perform hysteroscopy at our facility. Other medical procedures like D&C for miscarriages and will continue as planned.

Do you test for COVID-19 at Fertility Centers of Illinois?

We do not test for COVID-19, all testing must be done at your primary care provider (PCP) office. Any patient that has come in contact with a person known to be diagnosed with the COVID-19 virus or suspects they have been exposed should seek immediate care from PCP. No appointments at our offices can occur until medical clearance is provided by your PCP.

As of March 19th, all patients that arrive for an appointment will be asked a COVID-19 questionnaire and have their temperature taken before they are able to proceed with their appointment. If your temperature is 99 degrees or above, you will be sent home in accordance with regulations. We also request that you come to your appointment alone, no additional parties will be allowed (spouse, partner, or child) with the exception of those required to sign paperwork.

Have any staff been diagnosed with COVID-19?

Following the strict infection prevention protocols put in place, we have had no staff succumb to a COVID-19 diagnosis and continue to provide care at all our offices. 

What should I do if I am not feeling well?

The health of our patients and staff remains our primary concern. We ask that if you are experiencing a cough, fever, runny nose, or shortness of breath, please do not come to any FCI office. This is to protect you, our other patients, and our staff. The physicians at FCI recognize that there are many reasons to have a cough, runny nose and fever that are not associated with the COVID-19 virus, but we remain committed to the health of our patients and staff.

What should I do if a family member is diagnosed with COVID-19?

If you or a family member is diagnosed with COVID-19 it is recommended to self-quarantine for a minimum for two weeks (potentially longer if illness persists) and during that time you would have to stop fertility treatment. The necessity to minimize exposure to others at a clinic is a significant concern and would limit one’s ability to continue IVF treatment given the monitoring appointments required.

Should I cancel my upcoming appointment?

There is no need to cancel your appointment unless you have the symptoms of COVID-19 (cough, fever, respiratory issues, or shortness of breath). If you do have these symptoms, please do not come into any Fertility Centers of Illinois location and please contact your appointment location to let us know. We are happy to reschedule for you.

Will my appointment be changed or canceled?

We are continuing to care for existing patients who are currently ‘in-cycle’ or who require urgent stimulation and cryopreservation through March 31st. To follow guideline recommendations, we have suspended the start of any new treatment cycles (ovulation induction, IUI, IVF, retrievals, frozen embryo transfers, non-urgent egg freezing) as well as elective surgeries and non-urgent diagnostic procedures.

Any established FCI patient who is scheduled to meet with their physician in the near future will be encouraged to change their appointment to a phone consult, or telemedicine consult, in lieu of an in-person consultation. Please understand this policy is in place to increase social distancing for you and our staff’s wellbeing and has become the standard of medical care during this pandemic. We encourage you to reach out to your insurance provider if you have any questions regarding coverage of telemedicine services, but it’s unclear if that will be covered by insurance.

Infertility testing (blood work, ultrasound, saline sonograms) must be completed before April 1, but we will NOT be able to start any diagnostic workup for new patients at this time.

Your FCI front desk, phlebotomy, ultrasound, and nursing teams will need to be in the offices to continue to provide you with exceptional fertility care in these trying times. However, we will also begin to transition staff to work at home as feasible. Your physical care will continue (blood draws, ultrasounds, etc.), but any questions outside of this care will be managed via phone after you leave the office. In an effort to improve social distancing, FCI may ask you to commute to a different office.

We also will require that you attend your scheduled appointments alone. Effective immediately, we will not permit anyone to attend the appointment with you, including children. This is for your safety and the safety of our patients and employees. It is our hope that cycles delayed or canceled can resume in the next 4-6 weeks.

Should I stop fertility treatment if I am diagnosed with COVID-19?

If you are undergoing active fertility treatment and diagnosed with COVID-19, the ASRM suggests that you consider freezing eggs and avoiding an embryo transfer until you are disease-free. This may mean converting an IVF cycle to egg retrieval and freezing eggs or embryos. Their recommendations also state that patients, including prospective egg and sperm donors, as well as gestational carriers, who meet the diagnostic criteria for COVID-19 infection, should avoid becoming pregnant. For patients undergoing active fertility treatments who contract COVID-19, or show signs of active infections, FCI will cancel their procedure to avoid further transmission of the virus.

Could my treatment be canceled?

Due to the changing regulations and recommendations, our treatment policy has been updated, which may impact your current treatment plans. The updated policy is as follows:

  • Any fresh or frozen embryo transfer, endometrial receptivity assay assessment cycle, or intrauterine inseminations must be completed before April 1, or FCI will need to delay your cycle.
  • All In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) or Fertility Preservation (egg freezing) cycles must start injection therapy before Thursday, March 19, 2020, or we will need to delay starting your treatment until new recommendations are released.
  • Any fresh IVF embryos that are not transferred before April 1 will need to be frozen for a future transfer.
  • Because patients with cancer cannot delay, fertility preservation treatment will continue throughout the COVID-19 crisis
  • Effective immediately we will not start any new IUI or frozen embryo transfer protocols. Patients can be cycled on birth control pills, which will allow them to be able to resume care shortly after the current restrictions are lifted.
  • Following the Surgeon General’s recommendations after Friday, March 20, 2020, FCI will no longer be able to perform hysteroscopy at our facility. Other medical procedures like D&C for miscarriages and endometrial biopsies will continue as planned.

Please consider that we follow all federal, state, and local guidelines as well as the recommendations of the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) in conjunction with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In these unprecedented circumstances, there is always a chance that new regulation, medical recommendation or development could disrupt treatment. Your care team will advise you regarding changes that may impact your treatment plan. You are also invited to reach out to your care team with any questions or concerns.

What additional circumstances could impact my treatment?

With state and federal policymakers trying to manage COVID-19, we expect current laws and guidelines to continually change. It is likely that at some point the medical societies will recommend that patients and clinics stop fertility treatments. Additionally, it is possible that the FCI staff could become affected by the COVID-19 virus. Finally, supplies could run out where we are unable to physically provide medical care. If this occurs, we will try to finish your current treatment cycle, if the circumstances allow. In any event, your clinical team will keep you informed of your next steps.

How are you preventing sick patients from coming to your offices?

As of March 19th, all patients that arrive for an appointment will be asked a COVID-19 questionnaire and have their temperature taken before they are able to proceed with their appointment. If your temperature is 99 degrees or above, you will be sent home in accordance with regulations.

Any patient that has traveled to an at-risk area is not permitted to have an appointment at any FCI office until at least 14 days after their return from the at-risk region. Any patient that has traveled to an at-risk area, and has waited at least 14 days after they have returned from the area, can only have an appointment with FCI if they are not experiencing flu-like symptoms.

How are you ensuring the safety of patients in regard to the health of your staff?

All FCI employees are already using universal infection prevention techniques. Due to the seriousness of COVID-19, FCI has implemented new policies and procedures based on the CDC recommendations to further reduce the risk of virus transmission.

In addition to regular handwashing and cleaning equipment between patients, we are asking employees and patients to minimize physical contact by avoiding handshakes, and celebratory or conciliatory embraces. We have asked employees to not share pens between staff and patients, so we encourage you to bring your own if you need them during your appointment.

For consultation appointments, we are moving to telemedicine appointments on Zoom to ensure patients and staff are fully protected. We ask that you come to your visit alone unless additional consent is required. If you choose to visit for FET during this time, you will be required to sign a waiver.

How are you ensuring the safety of patients by providing a clean environment?

For additional protection, FCI will have hand sanitizers, soap and other transmission reducing aids available for your use at the offices. We suggest you thoroughly wash your hands for 20 seconds upon entering any FCI office, and again as you exit. Unfortunately, supplies of masks, hand sanitizer, and soap are in high demand, so many of these items are on backorder. We will do our best to keep them in stock and available.

In addition to these measures, each FCI office will undergo a thorough daily cleaning to disinfect surfaces, doorknobs, and common areas to further reduce the possibility of virus transmission. Periodic extra deep cleaning of an office may be required, necessitating the closure of an office with little warning.

What measures are you taking to ensure the risk of transmission is lessened?

We are implementing the following new policies to further reduce the risk of transmission to staff and other patients:

  • If you are sick, please remain at home and contact your primary care physician if you need medical attention.
  • We ask you not to bring anyone with you to your appointments unless they need testing or have to sign consents. No friends, family, children, etc.
  • The nursing staff will call you after your daily monitoring instead of meeting with you.
  • We hope to begin to offer phone, and telemedicine consults for return patients, but they may not be covered by insurance.
  • By Monday, March 23, we will be triaging every person before they enter the clinical space with thermal scanners and a COVID-10 questionnaire.
  • We are also ramping down treatment over the next couple of weeks by completing ‘in cycle’ patients and halting the start of new treatments.

Will I be charged for a canceled cycle due to COVID-19?

As a patient, you have paid for services to this point in your treatment. Should your treatment have to stop, when you begin again you will only be responsible for the portion of services after where you left off. We understand that canceled cycles present financial hardships, so our finance team will be providing discounted treatments after the COVID-19 crisis passes and we are able to resume providing fertility services again. As always, we remain 100% committed to supporting you in achieving your goal of family building. Our patients are like family, and we are grateful for the opportunity to earn your trust.

Pregnancy – Updated 3/26/2020

Should I avoid becoming pregnant right now?

Yes, the ASRM advises that all women undergoing treatment should not undergo any procedures that could cause pregnancy. This includes intrauterine insemination (IUI), embryo transfer and frozen embryo transfer. This may mean converting an IVF cycle to retrieval and freezing of eggs/embryos.

How does COVID-19 affect pregnancy?

The current minimal evidence suggests that pregnant women are no more likely to become infected with COVID-19 than non-pregnant women. We do not have information from published scientific reports about the susceptibility of pregnant women to COVID-19.

Pregnant women experience immunologic and physiologic changes which might make them more susceptible to viral respiratory infections, including COVID-19. Pregnant women also might be at risk for severe illness, morbidity, or mortality compared to the general population as observed in cases of other related coronavirus infections [including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV)] and other viral respiratory infections, such as influenza, during pregnancy.

How does COVID-19 impact a baby?

According to the CDC, it is unknown at this time how COVID-19 can impact the health of a baby after birth. It is still unknown if a pregnant woman with COVID-19 can pass the virus to her fetus or baby during pregnancy or delivery. In the small number of cases to date, no infants born to mothers with COVID-19 have tested positive for the virus. The COVID-19 virus was also not found in samples of amniotic fluid or breastmilk. Antibodies against COVID-19 have been detected in breast milk, which may offer some protection to the baby. This reassuring information shows that there is likely no cause for concern if a pregnant woman is confirmed to have COVID-19.

How can pregnant women protect themselves?

Pregnant women should take the same precautionary measures as any individual. The CDC recommends that all people follow basic hygiene guidelines to decrease the potential for viral transmission:

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Between hand washes, use sanitizer regularly, especially after touching doorknobs and keyboards in public places.
  • Avoid touching your face (nose, eyes, mouth) with unwashed or unsanitized hands.
  • If you are sick, please stay home and take care of yourself.
  • Practice social distancing of six feet to those around you.
  • If you believe you may have been exposed, opt to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or cough into your elbow. Throw away any used tissues promptly and wash your hands immediately.

How does COVID-2019 impact intended parents?

Currently, there are no specific guidelines related to intended parents. Based on limited data and studies from previous coronaviruses (SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV) and a small number of COVID-19 cases, intended parents are not at a higher risk of contracting COVID-19. However, based on limited data and studies from previous coronaviruses (SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV) and a small number of COVID-19 cases, pregnant women may be at a higher risk for severe illness compared to the general population. We do not know if COVID-19 can cross the placenta during pregnancy, but there have not been any new cases of newborns screening positive for COVID-19. Please see more information on the CDC’s Pregnancy & Breastfeeding page.

Symptoms – Updated 3/17/2020

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Common symptoms of COVID-19 infection include fever, respiratory symptoms, cough, and/or shortness of breath. If you have any of the above symptoms, please alert your primary care provider and FCI medical team.

What emergency warning signs for COVID-19 require immediate medical attention?

Anyone with COVID-19 experiencing symptoms such as difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, persistent pain or pressure in the chest, bluish lips or face or an inability to arouse should seek medical attention immediately.

How does COVID-19 spread?

It can be spread person-to-person through respiratory droplets from a cough or sneeze. Most people will have a mild infection and will recover fully if the virus was contracted.

Who is considered a more at-risk population?

Healthy women and men of childbearing age are not at an elevated risk.  According to the CDC, those at higher risk include older adults and those with serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes.

What should I do if I have symptoms?

As medical specialists, FCI is not able to order testing for the COVID-19 virus for our patients. This test is both ordered and managed by the patient’s primary care team. At this time, any FCI patient who exhibits flu-like symptoms of fever, cough, runny nose, will be asked by FCI staff to see their primary care physician. FCI will require a note from your physician that you are not infected with COVID-19 virus before you can return to our clinic, or continue with treatment. This is for your protection, other patients’ safety and the welfare of FCI staff.

Prevention – Updated 3/17/2020

What is the best way to prevent COVID-19?

The CDC recommends that all people follow basic hygiene guidelines to decrease the potential for viral transmission:

  • Washing your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Between hand washes, use sanitizer regularly, especially after touching doorknobs and keyboards in public places.
  • Avoid touching your face (nose, eyes, mouth) with unwashed or unsanitized hands.
  • Practice social distancing of six feet to those around you.
  • If you believe you may have been exposed, opt to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • If you are sick, please stay home and take care of yourself.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or cough into your elbow. Throw away any used tissues promptly and wash your hands immediately.

If you are exhibiting any symptoms listed above, please notify your FCI healthcare team by calling your appointment location and asking to speak with a nurse.

Should I wear a mask?

Please be aware that the masks we utilize for medical care do not provide protection against the COVID-19 virus. These masks only work to contain your secretions so that you do not infect others. Locally and nationally, supplies have been depleted from many stores. Because of this, we ask that you do not remove supplies from our offices. Patients do have the option to wear a protective mask or cover your face with a scarf for personal protection. Due to the national shortage, you will be required to purchase your own mask or face protection.

Is there a vaccine for COVID-19?

Scientists are working on developing a vaccine but it will not be available for quite some time. Because less is known about the virus and there is no vaccine for it, it is especially important that protective measures are taken to protect the public (mainly those who are medically susceptible).

Can I still travel?

We recommend that patients avoid travel by all means necessary. To see up-to-date COVID-19 hot spots, please go to the CDC website.

Where should I go for additional information?

If you have any additional questions, we encourage you to reach out to your care team. You can also find more information online at these trusted resources:

1. Illinois Department of Health (IDEPH)

2. Center for Disease Control/Public Health (CDC)

3. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

4. American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM)/SART

5. American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG)